Filter and format extracted data using the Type parameter in a Field object.

For example, the following field returns null unless it finds data that Sensible recognizes as a number:

{
  "fields": [
    {
      "id": "typed_field",
      "type": "number",
      "anchor": "duration in years:",
      "method": {
        "id": "label",
        "position": "right"
      }
    },
  ]
}

The following types are available:

Address
Boolean
Compose
Currency
Custom
Date
Distance
Images
Name
Number
Paragraph
Percentage
Phone Number
String
Table
Weight
Deprecated types

Address

Returns USA-based addresses. By default, Sensible recognizes single- or multi-line addresses isolated from other lines in "block" format. For example, "type":"address" recognizes address such as:

Click to enlarge

Use the Block Format parameter to recognize addresses embedded in non-address lines, for example, use:

  "type": {
    "id": "address",
    "block_format": false
  } 

to find addresses in paragraphs:

Click to enlarge

Example output

{
    "value": "11 Center Street\nAmherst, MA 01002",
    "type": "address"
  }

Formats recognized

With either block or in-line address, Sensible recognizes these formats:

  • City, State, Zip, and variant representations of these elements such as abbreviations
  • Digits, Street, City, State, Zip, and variant representations of these elements such as abbreviations
  • PO boxes with a number represented in digits
  • Lists of addresses in the preceding formats
  • Addresses that span multiple lines. To enable this behavior, Sensible joins the lines returned by the method using whitespaces as the separators, and finds the type in the joined text.

Sensible is less sensitive to non-address text if you configure "block_format": false:

BlockIn-line
Newlines optionalyesyes
Trailing or leading non-address text allowed in starting or ending address linesnoyes
Non-address text allowed between address elementsnono

For example:

# block format

San Francisco, CA 94110

123 Waverly Pl San Francisco, CA 941104123

PO BOX 1058 San Francisco, CA 94110

123 Waverly Pl
San Francisco, CA
941104123

# inline format

the shipping address is 123 Waverly Pl
San Francisco, CA, 94110. The billing address is the same. 

This type doesn't match text that lacks a zip code, such as 11 Center Street, Amherst, MA.

Boolean

Returns true for the following case-insensitive strings:

true
yes
y

Returns false for the following case-insensitive strings:

false
no
n

Example output:

{
  source: "YES",
  type: "boolean",
  value: true,
}

Compose

Returns a transformed type you define using an array of types. In the array, each successive type in the array takes the previous type's output as its input. For example, use this type:

  • As a more syntactically concise alternative to the Regex method or to Computed Field methods. For example, you can write a field to capture a date-typed field, then transform the field's output with the Split method. Or, see the following example to transform dates using the Compose type.
  • To transform table cell contents. As an alternative, see the NLP table method for writing natural-language instructions to transform table cell contents.

Parameters

keyvaluedescription
id (required)compose
types (required)array of type objectsEach type in a compose array takes the output of the previous type as its input.

Examples

Config

{
  "fields": [
    {
      "id": "maintenance_records",
      "anchor": "date",
      "type": "table",
      "method": {
        "id": "table",
        "columns": [
          {
            "id": "col1_date",
            "type": {
              "id": "compose",
              "types": [
                {
                  /* convert variable source date formats to standard format
                     YYYY-MM-DDT00:00:00.000Z */
                  "id": "date"
                },
                /* convert date type's output to YYYY-MM using a capturing group */
                {
                  "id": "custom",
                  "pattern": "^([0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2})-[0-9]{2}"
                } 
              ]
            },
            "terms": [
              "date",
            ],
          },
          {
            "id": "col2_description",
            "terms": [
              "description"
            ],
          }
        ],
        "stop": {
          "type": "startsWith",
          "text": "keep"
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Example document
The following image shows the example document used with this example config:

Click to enlarge

Example documentDownload link

Output

{
  "maintenance_records": {
    "columns": [
      {
        "id": "col1_date",
        "values": [
          {
            "value": "2021-12",
            "type": "string"
          },
          {
            "value": "2022-03",
            "type": "string"
          },
          null,
          {
            "value": "2023-01",
            "type": "string"
          }
        ]
      },
      {
        "id": "col2_description",
        "values": [
          {
            "value": "Changed oil",
            "type": "string"
          },
          {
            "value": "New front tires",
            "type": "string"
          },
          {
            "value": "Battery replaced",
            "type": "string"
          },
          {
            "value": "Changed oil",
            "type": "string"
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  }
}

Currency

You can define this type using concise syntax, or you can configure options with expanded syntax.

Simple syntax

Syntax example

"type": "currency"

Output example

Returns USA dollars as absolute value. For example,

{
    "source": "3 bil",
    "value": 3000000000,
    "unit": "$",
    "type": "currency"
  }

Formats recognized

Sensible by default recognizes USA decimal notation (for example, 1,500.06). Recognizes abbreviated quantities, such as k for thousand.

To recognize European decimal notation (for example, 1.500,06), see the following configurable syntax section.

Recognizes digits with the following formatting:

  • dollar sign, optional commas every three digits, optional cents after period

  • commas every three digits, optional cents after period

  • no dollar sign, up to six digits without commas as sole line contents. Allow up to nine digits if cents are present.

Recognizes abbreviated and written-out quantities as follows:

  • thousand, k
  • million, mil, mm, m
  • billion, bil, b
  • trillion, t

For example:

$1k
5k
1,000,000.056
$5.33
1 mm
3 bil
2 thousand

This type doesn't match text such as one million or 123456789.

Configurable syntax

Use configurable syntax to change the default recognized formats.

Example syntax

"type":
  {
    "id": "currency",
    "currencySymbol": "€",
    "requireCurrencySymbol": true,  
    "thousandsSeparator": ".",
    "decimalSeparator": ",", 
    "maxValue": 10000,
  }

Example output

{
    "source": "€3.567,01",
    "value": 3567.01,
    "unit": "€",
    "type": "currency"
  }

Parameters

keyvaluedescription
id (required)currency
requireCurrencySymbolboolean. Default: falseRequires a currency symbol preceding the amount.
currencySymbolstring or object. Default: $The text to recognize as a currency symbol, for example "€" or "EURO". The text must precede the amount. This parameter sets the Unit parameter in the output.
To specify multiple currencies to recognize, use this parameter to specify a lookup table. The table maps source text to the Unit parameter. For example, the following lookup table recognizes currency codes and symbols for dollars and euros, and outputs symbols to the Unit parameter:
"currencySymbol": {
"$": "$"
"€": "€"
"USD": "$",
"EUR": "€",
"default": "€"}
If the source text doesn't include a currency symbol, Sensible uses the default specified in the lookup table. If the lookup table doesn't include a default, Sensible falls back to the $ symbol.
requireThousandsSeparatorboolean. Default: falseRequires a thousands separator in numbers with a thousands place.
thousandsSeparatorstring. Default: ,The separator to require, for example .
decimalSeparatorstring. Default: .For numbers with a decimal place, specify the separator, for example ,.
maxDecimalDigitsnumber. Default: 4The maximum number of decimal digits to recognize.
maxValuenumber. Default: infinityThe maximum currency amount to recognize. Use this to extract an amount with a known range. For example, use it as an alternative to the Tiebreaker parameter, or to extract one currency amount among several returned by a method like the Document Range or Box method.
minValuenumber. Default: infinityThe minimum currency amount to recognize. Use this to extract an amount with a known range.
relaxedWithCentsBoolean. default: falseUse this parameter when poor-quality scans or photographed documents result in erroneous OCR output for the decimal separator or thousands separator.
If true, Sensible overrides all other Currency type parameters, outputs USD currency, and recognizes the following number format as a currency:

- any number of digits mixed with <fuzzySeparator> characters, followed by
- one <fuzzySeparator> character, followed by
- two digits (for the cents)

where a <fuzzySeparator> character is any of the following common erroneous OCR outputs for a period or comma:
.,;: _ (period, comma, semicolon, colon, space, underscore)

For example, if you set this parameter to true, then for the erroneous OCR output "7.859:36", Sensible returns:
{"source": "7.859:36",
"type": "currency",
"unit": "$",
"value": 7859.36}
accountingNegativedefault, anyParentheses, bothParentheses, suffixNegativeSign Default: nullReplaces the deprecated Accounting Currency type. Specifies to recognize accounting sign conventions for negative numbers.
null Sensible recognizes negative numbers as described in the preceding formats recognized section.
bothParentheses - Sensible assigns a negative value to a number prefixed and suffixed by parentheses.
anyParentheses - Sensible assigns a negative value to a number that includes any parentheses as a suffix or prefix. Use this option to handle OCR errors, where an opening or closing parenthesis can be incorrectly recognized as other characters.
suffixNegativeSign - Sensible assigns a negative value to number suffixed by a negative sign.
default Replaces the behavior of the Accounting Currency type for backward compatibility. The equivalent of bothParentheses and suffixNegativeSign.
alwaysNegativebooleanIf true, Sensible assigns a negative value to a number and ignores sign symbols in the document. For example, use this to capture values in the debit column of an accounting document, where negative signs are omitted.
removeSpacesbooleanRemoves whitespace in a line for better currency recognition. For example, changes the line $ 12.45 to $12.45.

Custom

Returns a custom type you define using regular expressions. For example, define types for zip codes, time durations, customer IDs, and order numbers.

Example syntax

"type":
  {
    "id": "custom",
    "pattern": "Time\\:\\s*([0-9][0-9]:[0-9][0-9])",
    "type": "time_24_hr_military"
  }

Example output

This type outputs strings. For example:

{
    "source": "Time: 14:01",
    "value": "14:01",
    "type": "time_24_hr_military"
  }

Parameters

keyvaluedescription
id (required)custom
pattern (required)Valid JS regexJavascript-flavored regular expression. Returns the first capturing group.
Double escape special characters since the regex is in a JSON object. For example, \\s, not \s , to represent a whitespace character.
Sensible doesn't validate regular expressions for custom types.
flagsJS-flavored regex flags.Flags to apply to the regex. for example: "i" for case-insensitive.
matchMultipleLinesBoolean. default: falseIf true, matches regular expressions that span multiple lines. To enable this behavior, Sensible joins the lines returned by the method using whitespaces as the separators, and runs the regular expression on the joined text.
^ matches the start of the first line returned by the method, and $ matches the end of the last line. For example, ^[0-9 ]+$ matches all the joined text returned by the method, if all the characters are digits or whitespaces.

Date

You can define this type using concise syntax, or you can configure options with expanded syntax.

Sensible matches dates that span multiple lines. To enable this behavior, Sensible joins the lines returned by the method using whitespaces as the separators, and finds the type in the joined text.

Simple syntax

Syntax example

"type":"date"

Output example

{
    "source": "Feb 1, 21",
    "value": "2021-02-01T00:00:00.000Z",
    "type": "date"
}

Formats recognized

Sensible recognizes the following date formats by default:

"%m/%d/%Y",
"%m/%d/%y",
"%m/%Y",
"%b %d,? %Y",
"%b %d,? %y",
"%b %dst,? %Y",
"%b %dst,? %y",
"%b %dnd,? %Y", 
"%b %dnd,? %y",
"%b %dth,? %Y",
"%b %dth,? %y",
"%b %drd,? %Y",
"%b %drd,? %y",
"%m-%d-%Y",
"%m-%d-%y",
"%Y-%m-%d",
"%Y%M%D"

See the following configurable syntax section for definitions of the field descriptors in the preceding list.

The following are examples of date formats that Sensible recognizes by default:

5/17/2018
november 30, 1955
Feb 1, 21
June 7th, 2021
Jan. 9th, 09

Configurable syntax

Syntax example

The following example:

"type":
  {
    "id": "date",
    "format": ["%b-%d[a-z]{2}-%y$", "%y%M%D", "%b\\\\%d\\\\%Y", "%b\\s*?%Y"]   
  }

Recognizes the following date formats and ignores all default formats:

formatexampleexample output
"%b-%d[a-z]{2}-%y$"JAN-31st-22,
February-3rd-21
"value": "2022-01-31T00:00:00.000Z"
"%y%M%D"800325"value": "1980-03-25T00:00:00.000Z",
"%b\\\\%d\\\\%Y"JAN\31\2022"value": "2022-01-31T00:00:00.000Z"
"%b\\s*?%Y"jan 2022"value": "2022-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"

Parameters

keyvaluedescription
id (required)dateReturns datetime. Sensible outputs the time as midnight UTC.
formatJS regex or array of JS regexsCustom date formats override the defaults listed in the simple syntax section.
See the following table for a list of the field descriptors. The field descriptors are concise syntax for regular expressions. You can use Javascript-flavored regular expressions ("regex") with these field descriptors to define custom date formats. Double escape special characters since the regex is in a JSON object (for example, \\s, not \s , to represent a whitespace character).

The following table lists the field descriptors you can use to define a custom format other than the default formats listed in the simple syntax section.

field descriptorregexnotesexample
%bfor each month, case-insensitive pattern like january OR jan\.?Abbreviated month name, with or without periods, or full month name.Jan, Feb, ..., Dec.
January, February, ..., December
%y[0-9]{2}Two-digit year.
Values in the range 69–99 refer to years in the twentieth century (1969–1999); values in the range 00–68 refer to years in the twenty-first century (2000–2068).
Tips: If you want to recognize two-digit years and exclude four-digit years, add an end-of-line regex special character $ in formats like "%m/%d/%y$" so that you don't incorrectly match dates like 02/03/1998 as 2019-02-03T00:00:00.000Z.
If you want to match both two- and four-digit years, you don't need the $ character. Instead you need to specify the four-digit format first, for example, ["%b-%d-%Y","%b-%d-%y"].
00, 01, ..., 99
%Y[0-9]{4}Four-digit year (year with century as a decimal number).2013, 2019 etc.
%m[0-9]{1,2}The month number, unpadded or zero-padded.1,...,12
01,...,12
%M[0-9]{2}Two-digit ("zero-padded") month number (01-12).01,...,12
%d[0-9]{1,2}The day number, unpadded or zero-padded1,...,31
01,...,31
%D[0-9]{2}Two-digit ("zero-padded") day number (01-31).01,...,31

Distance

Returns miles and kilometers. Recognizes digits followed optionally by kilometers, miles, or their abbreviations. For example:

3,001.5 kilometers
2 km
1.5 kms
1 mile
4 mi
45

Example output:

 {
    "source": "3,001.5 kilometers",
    "value": 3001.5,
    "unit": "kilometers",
    "type": "distance"
  }

Images

Use this solely with the Document Range method to return image metadata.

Name

Simple syntax

Syntax example

"type": "name"

Output example

Returns one or more names. For example:

{
  "source": "Richard & Ann Spangenberg",
  "type": "name",
  "value": [
      "Richard Spangenberg",
      "Ann Spangenberg"
}

Formats recognized

Doesn't recognize a list of names more than 6 words long. Doesn't recognize lists of three or more names such as last1, last2, & last3

Recognizes names of the formats below, and variant representations of these elements such as abbreviations.

  • first last
  • first1 last1 and first2 last2
  • last, first1 and first2
  • first1 and first2 last
  • first1 last1, first2 last2,... firstN, lastN

For example:

John R. Smith Sr
Richard & Ann Spangenberg
DuBois, Renee and Lois 
Argos Fullington, Jax Odenson, Ollie Longstreet

Configurable syntax

Example syntax

"type":
  {
    "id": "name",
    "capitalization": "allCaps"
  }

Example output

{
  "source": "Richard & Ann Spangenberg",
  "type": "name",
  "value": [
      "RICHARD SPANGENBERG",
      "ANN SPANGENBERG"
}

Parameters

keyvaluedescription
id (required)name
capitalizationallCaps, firstLetter. Default: no change to source capitalizationFormats the output in all uppercase, or with the first letter of each word capitalized.

Number

Recognizes digits in USA decimal notation. Recognizes one or more digits, optionally followed either by:

  • commas preceding every three digits, optional digits after period, or by
  • digits after period

For example:

-3.1
3,500,053.78
1234567890

This type does not recognize text such as 3.061.534,45. Configure the Currency type instead.

Example output

{
    "source": "123456789",
    "value": 123456789,
    "type": "number"
}

Paragraph

Use with methods that return paragraphs, for example Document Range or Paragraph, to format the extracted text. By default, returns paragraphs formatted with newline characters (\n), instead of formatted as a single string.

Simple syntax

Syntax example

"type": "paragraph"

Output example

For any move in date that is after the 15th of the month, Tenant must pay a full month of rent in order to gain possession of the home. The prorated rent amount will be due the second month of lease.\n Every month thereafter, Lessee must pay rent on or before the 1st day of each month with 5 days of grace period. Excludes utility costs.\n

Formats recognized

Sensible recognizes paragraphs separated by configurable vertical gaps, or "paragraph breaks." Sensible doesn't use paragraph margins, for indentations, to detect paragraphs.

Configurable syntax

Use configurable syntax to change the formatting of the extracted text.

Example syntax

"type":
  {
    "id": "paragraph",
    "annotateSuperscriptAndSubscript": true
  }

Example output

For the following document:

Click to enlarge

When you set"annotateSuperscriptAndSubscript": true , Sensible formats the footnote symbols to indicate they're superscripted, for example, [^1]:

{
  "lease_duration": {
    "type": "string",
    "value": "12/31/2023 [^1] . Thereafter, it shall be month-to-month on the same terms and conditions as stated herein plus $80.00 month to month charge, save any changes made pursuant to law, until terminated by notice of at least 30 days. [^2]\n[^1] Landlord shall send notice of new terms 30 days before current terms end. [^2] Proper 30 day notice (in writing or email) must be received by the Landlord."
  }
}

Parameters

keyvaluedescription
id (required)paragraph
annotateSuperscriptAndSubscriptBoolean. default: falseWhen true:
- Sensible annotates subscript and superscript text with [^...] and [_...], respectively.
- Sensible annotates end-of-page breaks with [EOP].
allNewlinesBoolean. default: falseWhen true, Sensible inserts a newline (\n) in the output for every line break in the document text, and two newlines (\n\n), for every paragraph break.
When false, Sensible inserts a newline for every paragraph break.
paragraphBreakThresholddefault: 0.4By default, Sensible detects paragraph breaks when the vertical gap between two lines is larger than 40% of the font height of the output line. Use this parameter to change the percentage.

Percentage

Returns percent as an absolute value. Recognizes a percent formatted as digits in USA decimal notation (for example, 1,500.06), followed optionally by a whitespace, followed by a percent sign (%) .

For example:

20.1 %
20.1%
1,000.05%

Example output

 {
    "source": "20.5%",
    "value": 20.5,
    "type": "percentage"
  }

Phone Number

Returns phone numbers:

  • Recognizes USA 10-digit phone numbers either with or without a country calling code. May be optionally formatted with parentheses, dashes, spaces, plus sign (+), or periods.

  • Recognizes international phone numbers if prefixed by a country calling code (for example, +91 for India).

Examples:

1-888-353-9578
+18883539578
888.353.9577
888 353 3264
888 353-3232
(207) 312-6767
+91 9999999999
+91 9999 999999
+91 9999-999999

Example output

{
    "type": "phoneNumber",
    "source": "(855) 786-3246",
    "value": "+18557863246"
}

This type does not recognize country calling codes formatted with 00, for example, 0091 or 001.

String

Default type. Returns strings.

Example output

{
    "type": "string",
    "value": "3 bil"
}

Table

Required when you define a Table method, for example, Invoice, Fixed Table, or NLP Table.

Weight

Returns pounds and kilograms. Recognizes digits in USA decimal notation (for example, 1,500.06):

  • digits are in the format recognized by the Number type

  • "pounds", "kilograms", or their abbreviations follow the digits

For example:

1,000.4 kg
1 kilo
5.5 kilograms
6.00 lbs
1 pound
634.83

Example output

{
    "source": "6,000.01 lbs",
    "value": 6000.01,
    "unit": "pounds",
    "type": "weight"
}

Deprecated types

Accounting Currency

Deprecated. See Currency

Returns US dollar numbers. Supports negative numbers represented either with parentheses () or with the minus sign (-).

Recognizes digits in USA decimal notation (for example, 1,500.06):

  • digits are in the format recognized by the Number type
  • digits are optionally preceded or succeeded by a negative sign (-)
  • digits are optionally preceded by a USA dollar sign ($)

Examples:

56,999
-$527.01
$527.01-
(1,000)
($400.567)

Example output

 {
    "source": "($400.567)",
    "value": -400.567,
    "unit": "$",
    "type": "accountingCurrency"
  }